Becoming a citizen

New Jersey is a popular area for immigrants to reach and settle in the U.S. because of its proximity to ports of entry as well as several major cities with job opportunities, networks of support, and other advantages. Taking the citizenship test is a key step in becoming a naturalized American citizen.

The citizenship test

The civics test to become a naturalized citizen, along with the test in English, are essential to pass in order to make it to the next stage. The English test is made up of writing, speaking, and reading sections, so it is important to know how to do all three. The civics test has material about how the U.S. government works and the process of passing laws. The federal government provides free study materials to help get ready to take this part of the test.

If an applicant fails either part of the test, they can retake it once a few months later. However, if they fail a second time, they won’t be able to be a naturalized citizen. While the process is straightforward, other stages in the naturalization journey require help in order to ensure that the paperwork and all requirements are fulfilled without any problems. Since naturalization has to confirm to a tight timeline, this is not something that should be attempted without help.

Passing these two tests is a core part of making progress towards citizenship. Studying for the civics exam can use the official materials, but studying for the English portion might require taking a course to ensure that the applicant has the right skills.

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